Fantastic Covid article

PittPanther44

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Apr 16, 2005
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I would strongly urge to give this a thorough read, without any preconceived notions. *Don’t let the title fool you*. You might not agree with 100% of it, but keep reading.

(if you skim it and then come back and post the same one liners you may have had before, you are showing part of what the article is getting at about why the reality is hard to see)

It’s an incredibly well written, nuanced-rich article about where we are, how we got here, and how we get out of it.

It captures a lot of what I’ve been saying for months, but my posting on a message board doesn’t articulate it nearly as well.

 
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Jan 3, 2019
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I would strongly urge to give this a thorough read, without any preconceived notions. *Don’t let the title fool you*. You might not agree with 100% of it, but keep reading.

(if you skim it and then come back and post the same one liners you may have had before, you are showing part of what the article is getting at about why the reality is hard to see)

It’s an incredibly well written, nuanced-rich article about where we are, how we got here, and how we get out of it.

It captures a lot of what I’ve been saying for months, but my posting on a message board doesn’t articulate it nearly as well.

For some reason I don't feel like reading past the first paragraph.
 
Jan 3, 2019
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Your choice. I would urge others to.
I'm still reading it, just an immediate observation. And it's the first paragraph in the story.

Meanwhile, as businesses closed and stay-at-home orders rolled out, “we presumed a trade-off between saving lives and saving the economy,” says Danielle Allen, a political scientist at Harvard. “That was foolishness of the most profound degree.”

You can squeeze down the ROI as much as you want but it's obviously going to leave you open to additional waves of the disease.

These errors crop up in all disasters. But the COVID-19 pandemic has special qualities that have exacerbated them. The virus moved quickly enough to upend the status quo in a few months, deepening the allure of the hastily abandoned past. It also moved slowly enough to sweep the U.S. in a patchwork fashion, allowing as-yet-untouched communities to drop their guard.

Again you have to think about both lowering the ROI and the effect those measures have on everyones lives and their wealth.

“People have stopped watching news about it as much, or talking to friends about it,” Redbird says. “I think we’re all exhausted.” Optimistically, this might mean that people are becoming less anxious and more resilient. More worryingly, it could also mean they are becoming inured to tragedy.

Yeah I see more lockdown injuries than covid
 

pittbb80

Athletic Director
Oct 9, 2004
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Actually the article is a pretty one sided view of the solution

Epidemiologists and economists largely agree that the economy cannot rebound while the pandemic is still raging. By treating the two as opposites, state leaders rushed to reopen, leading a barely contained virus to surge anew.

there are A number of highly respected epidemiologists and medical experts who disagree with that statement. The failure to acknowledge the opposing view makes the article highly slanted and mostly one authors opinion
 

PittPanther44

Senior
Apr 16, 2005
4,321
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I'm still reading it, just an immediate observation. And it's the first paragraph in the story.

Meanwhile, as businesses closed and stay-at-home orders rolled out, “we presumed a trade-off between saving lives and saving the economy,” says Danielle Allen, a political scientist at Harvard. “That was foolishness of the most profound degree.”

You can squeeze down the ROI as much as you want but it's obviously going to leave you open to additional waves of the disease.

These errors crop up in all disasters. But the COVID-19 pandemic has special qualities that have exacerbated them. The virus moved quickly enough to upend the status quo in a few months, deepening the allure of the hastily abandoned past. It also moved slowly enough to sweep the U.S. in a patchwork fashion, allowing as-yet-untouched communities to drop their guard.

Again you have to think about both lowering the ROI and the effect those measures have on everyones lives and their wealth.
True, but I think it shows that real solutions are about finding the right balance.

We intially shut down things that I think we can do safely (most shopping, salons, etc). On the other hand, we didn’t do enough to prevent large indoor gatherings with talking and eating

I love bars (especially this time of year), but I don’t see how they get back to normal before a vaccine. So I try to support them with more takeout, I’ll push outside seating as long as I can, etc.
 
Jan 3, 2019
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True, but I think it shows that real solutions are about finding the right balance.

We intially shut down things that I think we can do safely (most shopping, salons, etc). On the other hand, we didn’t do enough to prevent large indoor gatherings with talking and eating

I love bars (especially this time of year), but I don’t see how they get back to normal before a vaccine. So I try to support them with more takeout, I’ll push outside seating as long as I can, etc.
We are finding real solutions and the right balance. Everyone is.
 

PittPanther44

Senior
Apr 16, 2005
4,321
1,160
113
Actually the article is a pretty one sided view of the solution

Epidemiologists and economists largely agree that the economy cannot rebound while the pandemic is still raging. By treating the two as opposites, state leaders rushed to reopen, leading a barely contained virus to surge anew.

there are A number of highly respected epidemiologists and medical experts who disagree with that statement. The failure to acknowledge the opposing view makes the article highly slanted and mostly one authors opinion
I think you misunderstood that. I think they were referring to fact that some looked at it as a binary choice - full out opening while the virus rages, or killing the economy to contain it. It doesn’t have to be either or.

Yes, there was a rush to open everything too quickly. But that doesn’t mean doing it safer and in steps wasn’t possible. The reality is that there are reasonable solutions that don’t kill the economy
 

NCPitt

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I read the article. I was less than impressed. Sure, it mentioned a lot of things that were done wrong. We already knew those. It talked about some things we could have done better with little talk of why they weren't done at the time. They talk about misplaced priorities. Interestingly, they placed little blame there but managed to blast the Trump administration along the way. They constantly mentioned that other countries have done things better but never said which countries and what they did. They did specifically mention Sweden but only as a negative example. If only we were Sweden today. In short, I found the article to be exactly what I would expect from The Atlantic - not a complete waste of time but barely worth the effort.
 
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paschuler1970

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Nov 7, 2016
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I would strongly urge to give this a thorough read, without any preconceived notions. *Don’t let the title fool you*. You might not agree with 100% of it, but keep reading.

(if you skim it and then come back and post the same one liners you may have had before, you are showing part of what the article is getting at about why the reality is hard to see)

It’s an incredibly well written, nuanced-rich article about where we are, how we got here, and how we get out of it.

It captures a lot of what I’ve been saying for months, but my posting on a message board doesn’t articulate it nearly as well.

I find it interesting that the article was written 6 weeks ago and some of the thoughts are what we see today.

I do agree with NCPitt to a degree about his comments about Sweden and Trump.

However, if more people took personal responsibility and did some things we know would help we could lessen the impact of covid 19. I don't see it though because too many people are going to do their own thing without regards for others.
 

PittPanther44

Senior
Apr 16, 2005
4,321
1,160
113
I find it interesting that the article was written 6 weeks ago and some of the thoughts are what we see today.

I do agree with NCPitt to a degree about his comments about Sweden and Trump.

However, if more people took personal responsibility and did some things we know would help we could lessen the impact of covid 19. I don't see it though because too many people are going to do their own thing without regards for others.
Yeah I noticed that too. It was 6 weeks old, but the fall has progressed as predicted.
 
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NCPitt

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Mar 12, 2009
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I find it interesting that the article was written 6 weeks ago and some of the thoughts are what we see today.

I do agree with NCPitt to a degree about his comments about Sweden and Trump.

However, if more people took personal responsibility and did some things we know would help we could lessen the impact of covid 19. I don't see it though because too many people are going to do their own thing without regards for others.
I do agree with the part of the article that our culture is such that we don't/won't handle events like this well. We don't have a lot of experience and people are used to bad things passing quickly here. But none of that is really new to the folks here either.
 
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